Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington, Inc.
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Virtual Meeting: Finding Berko: Back to 1700 in Eastern Europe
Sunday, April 25
Virtual Meeting: Finding Berko: Back to 1700 in Eastern Europe  (Society Meetings)
1:30 pm
Members Only Free Program
With just a great grandfather’s name, year of birth, and supposed town of origin, how does an amateur genealogist discover earlier generations? Irene Bowen will explain how that “magic moment” came from organizing and exploring names and relationships in new ways. The first step was to create color-coded mini family trees from dozens of Russian records and 15 towns.  The second was to study patterns of given names through the generations. Persistence, online searches, and strokes of luck also helped.  This program explores a journey back through seven generations and 300 years, to find Berko, along with four other fourth and fifth great grandparents, in a tiny Ukrainian shtetl the family never knew  existed.
 
This one-hour program, conducted over Zoom, is a members-only event. It is one of the many activities that is a benefit of JGSGW membership. Instructions for joining the online meeting will be placed under Meeting Notes and Handouts in the Members Only Files. (These files become visible on this website after members sign in.) 
 
Speaker: Irene Bowen wants her children and grandchildren to know and appreciate their diverse heritage. A former civil rights attorney and now a consultant and speaker, she is currently chasing ancestors from numerous countries, including Czarist Russia, Great Britain, Ireland, and France. Her love of research, family history, and family stories led her to organize a 2018 trip with four other family members to several ancestral towns of her husband's grandparents in Ukraine, Lithuania, and Belarus. Irene is now completing her first of seven planned family history books, this one weaving in the heritage trip, Jewish history of Russia and Chicago, and her research about the line of her husband’s paternal grandmother.
 



Virtual Meeting: Genealogical Records from the Kingdom of Hungary
Sunday, May 23
Virtual Meeting: Genealogical Records from the Kingdom of Hungary  (Society Meetings)
1:30 pm
Members Only Free Program
Why should we care about Hungarian records if our ancestors never identified themselves as Hungarian? If they claimed to be from a country adjacent to Hungary (Slovakia or Romania or Ukraine, for example), they might have lived for some time in Hungary – without ever leaving their birthplace. Hungary was a monarchy beginning around the year 1000 and today is the Republic of Hungary. But from the late 18th through the early 20th century, Hungary’s boundaries and sovereignty repeatedly expanded and contracted. During the height of Eastern European immigration to America, Hungary encompassed territory that is now part of 15 different countries. This presentation will review the historical, political, and ethnic factors in play; provide sources for determining whether an ancestor’s birth, marriage, or death occurred in a place that was Hungary at that time but is now a different country; and offer strategies and techniques for determining where records of those events might be today.
 
This one-hour program, conducted over Zoom, is a members-only event. It is one of the many activities that is a benefit of JGSGW membership. Instructions for joining the online meeting will be placed under Meeting Notes and Handouts in the Members Only Files. (These files become visible on this website after members sign in.) 
 
Speaker:  Mary Ann Evan got her start in genealogy by listening as a child in Cleveland to her grandparents’ stories about “the old country.” In the 1980s she began tracing their paths back to their ancestral villages in Poland and has since visited all four of those villages and found living relatives in three of them. She has made several research trips to Eastern European countries. Mary Ann has been volunteering at the Washington, DC, Family History Center, in Kensington, Maryland, for more than 25 years, specializing in Eastern European countries but also assisting persons researching in many other areas of the world. She has made presentations at local family history conferences and meetings and is presently facilitating an Eastern European Focus group at the Family History Center.
 



Virtual Meeting: Finding My Father: His Century-Long Journey from World War I Warsaw
Sunday, June 13
Virtual Meeting: Finding My Father: His Century-Long Journey from World War I Warsaw  (Society Meetings)
1:30 pm
Members Only Free Program
In Finding My Father: His Century-Long Journey from World War I Warsaw and My Quest to Follow, renowned linguist and New York Times bestselling author Deborah Tannen pieces together the fascinating puzzle of her father’s life using letters and documents he saved; memories he taped and wrote down for her; and tapes, transcripts and notes from countless hours she spent talking to him about his past. Through writing about her father, she uncovers the many ways that he and his life shaped her own ... His journey from Warsaw’s Hasidic community to New York City is an evocative Jewish story that reflects the tensions of the century in which he lived--and challenges Tannen’s assumptions about her family and herself.
 
This one-hour program, conducted over Zoom, is a members-only event. It is one of the many activities that is a benefit of JGSGW membership. Instructions for joining the online meeting will be placed under Meeting Notes and Handouts in the Members Only Files. (These files become visible on this website after members sign in.) 
 
Speaker:  Deborah Tannen is on the faculty of the linguistics department at Georgetown University, where she holds the distinguished rank of University Professor. Her best known book is You Just Don't Understand: Women and Men in Conversation, which was on the New York Times best seller list for nearly four years She has been a guest 20/20, PBS NewsHour, Oprah, The Colbert Report, Nightline, and many shows on CNN and NPR  She has been featured in and written for major newspapers and magazines including The Atlantic, The New York Times, The Washington PostThe Wall Street Journal, Time, USA Today, and the Harvard Business Review. In addition to her linguistic research and writing, Dr. Tannen has published poems, short stories, and personal essays. Her first play, An Act of Devotion, about returning with her father to Warsaw, his birthplace, is included in The Best American Short Plays: 1993‑1994.
 



How to Use the JewishGen Discussion Group Effectively
Sunday, July 11
How to Use the JewishGen Discussion Group Effectively  (Society Meetings)
1:30 pm
Members Only Free Progam
In this talk Phil Goldfarb will help us understand how to use the on-line JewishGen Discussion Group. He will talk about what the group is about and how it can help you. He will also discuss the advantages of the new platform, the rules and guidelines for the group, how to join, settings for group message delivery, and other areas, as well as how to post your message, find archived messages, use hashtags, reply to messages, and other important tools. He will also tell us about some success stories from the discussion group and where to go to get help.
 
This one-hour program, conducted over Zoom, is a members-only event. It is one of the many activities that is a benefit of JGSGW membership. Instructions for joining the online meeting will be placed under Meeting Notes and Handouts in the Members Only Files. (These files become visible on this website after members sign in.) 
 
Speaker:  Phil Goldfarb. Researching genealogy for 35 years, Phil is the founding and current president of the JGS of Tulsa which he started in 2005. He has lectured extensively on various topics in genealogy, published articles on genealogy in numerous periodicals, and authors a monthly column in the Tulsa Jewish review.  He has written two books titled  “A Page of History: Passport Applications 1851-1914” and “A Page of History:  Passport Applications Volume II.” Phil is a member of the leadership team for JewishgGen as well as being the lead moderator for the JewishGen Discussion Group. He was the chairman of the 2020 IAJGS awards committee and sits on the board of directors for several nonprofit organizations. In July 2020 he won an Emmy Award as a producer for the Tulsa Historical Society's documentary titled: L’dor V’dor Generation to Generation: A History of Tulsa's Jewish Community which has been shown on PBS stations around the US. In his career he has personally given over 2000 presentations as well as teaching a course on presentation skills.